A Walk to Kurhaus (Kurhaus I)

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Upon taking a walk, visitors and Wiesbadeners alike will not really get around Kurhaus, the grand building that houses concert halls, a restaurant, and a casino famous for players like Fyodor Dostoevsky – his novel The Gambler is said to be based on the author’s own experience in Wiesbaden. The building seems to be the city’s (romantic?) heart.

If so, the nearby market place may the be the lungs… Which is where we departed for today’s walk, visually sniffing like a happy dog at some of the things along the way. We have had a look at the former palace, walked along the steps of the ‘new’ city hall, and seen a bit of its ornaments (above).

Turning around, we cannot miss Marktirche (‘Market Church’), a spectacular orange brick building that has already been photographed a million times. I think it is considered Wiesbaden’s capital church, and as history has it, it is protestant.  We rush along its walls towards the doors one of the city’s finest cinemas, Caligari (bottom) where a beautiful Art Deco interior is still intact. However, we will stay outside today – or we’ll never arrive at Kurhaus!

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Turning left and then right again, one of the city’s nicer arcades takes us to Wilhelmstraße, dominated here by the Theatre of the State (Hessisches Staatstheater). We sneak past the back side, taking in the closed faded curtains, and finally find ourselves in front of the Kurhaus’ revolving doors which I reserve for next Monday’s post: It will not be a long walk, but I consider it worth while, so that will be part of Jo’s Monday Walks (hoping that’s fine by our hostess).

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Traces of the Past

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Traces from a past when these were, strictly speaking, already traces from the past: Classicism was quite the thing when these buildings were erected roughly 150 years ago. I am fascinated by the ways the builders found around traditional – probably expensive – masonry: Mostly brick and cast iron and occasionally some wood were the materials used instead.

This is my (late) contribution for Paula’s Thursday’s Special which is really worth a visit.

2/3. Imagine

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What if every picture of the 2/3 series were a word? Each one acquires part of its meaning through a certain use in a certain context, any single picture relating to the sequence the way a word relates to a sentence, sentences after sentences – sequence after sequences – woven into a narrative. And then there are the simple words and the complex ones, some of them able to stand alone while others do not mean much outside the structure of the sentence. This might be the field I am currently playing on.

(I arrived at this short description because it seemed clear from the beginning that I might post the same picture more than once, depending on the use I might have for it in different contexts. That’s how I arrived at language: I also use some words more than once, and while they always almost mean the same, the sentences they are part of mean very different things.

You’ve seen two of the above pictures already, but I needed the car for obvious reasons. But was it necessary to re-post the last picture as well? Deleting it from this sequence felt like something went missing, so: yes, had to re-post it!)

The Changing Seasons: Downtown in April

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These pictures were taken in the mornings of April 8th till 10th – on my way to work again – except for the last one which shows the chair in front of an ice cream parlor in the late afternoon sun. I supposed that in comparison to the last Changing Seasons post the light would not have changed much since we went back do daylight saving time in the end of March. The weather was much nicer though, and with it, the light possibly a little warmer.

This is a contribution for Cardinal Guzman’s ongoing Changing Seasons project, which you should check out if you have the time. It will take you all around the world.