Pattern Recognition

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Here’s a contribution for Paleica’s Magic Mottos. This month, it is Blüten und Blätter (blossoms and leaves), and I felt like trying to come up with as many interpretations as I could. I began with focusing on nature’s abundance. Then I realized that many of the resulting pictures resembled patterns … or floral decorations that seem to be ubiquitous.

Ein Beitrag für Paleicas Magische Mottos. Dieses Mal waren es Blüten und Blätter, und ich habe versucht, so viele Interpretationen wie möglich zu finden. Es begann mit einem Blick auf Überfluss und Fülle der Natur. Dann fiel mir auf, dass die Bilder an Muster erinnern … an florale Dekorationen, wie man sie überall findet.

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Opposite Walls

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It has been for quite a while that I wanted to make these photos because the blue mosaic is quite unique for Wiesbaden and the bars add some extra art nouveau. All this was found in a passage leading into a commercial backyard in the downtown part of town.

Once there, capturing the blues, I thought, why don’t I also photograph the opposite side for Paula’s photo challenge? (Can you tell these are opposite walls? There is scientific evidence…)

A Walk to Kurhaus (Kurhaus I)

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Upon taking a walk, visitors and Wiesbadeners alike will not really get around Kurhaus, the grand building that houses concert halls, a restaurant, and a casino famous for players like Fyodor Dostoevsky – his novel The Gambler is said to be based on the author’s own experience in Wiesbaden. The building seems to be the city’s (romantic?) heart.

If so, the nearby market place may the be the lungs… Which is where we departed for today’s walk, visually sniffing like a happy dog at some of the things along the way. We have had a look at the former palace, walked along the steps of the ‘new’ city hall, and seen a bit of its ornaments (above).

Turning around, we cannot miss Marktirche (‘Market Church’), a spectacular orange brick building that has already been photographed a million times. I think it is considered Wiesbaden’s capital church, and as history has it, it is protestant.  We rush along its walls towards the doors one of the city’s finest cinemas, Caligari (bottom) where a beautiful Art Deco interior is still intact. However, we will stay outside today – or we’ll never arrive at Kurhaus!

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Turning left and then right again, one of the city’s nicer arcades takes us to Wilhelmstraße, dominated here by the Theatre of the State (Hessisches Staatstheater). We sneak past the back side, taking in the closed faded curtains, and finally find ourselves in front of the Kurhaus’ revolving doors which I reserve for next Monday’s post: It will not be a long walk, but I consider it worth while, so that will be part of Jo’s Monday Walks (hoping that’s fine by our hostess).

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Traces of the Past

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Traces from a past when these were, strictly speaking, already traces from the past: Classicism was quite the thing when these buildings were erected roughly 150 years ago. I am fascinated by the ways the builders found around traditional – probably expensive – masonry: Mostly brick and cast iron and occasionally some wood were the materials used instead.

This is my (late) contribution for Paula’s Thursday’s Special which is really worth a visit.

One Corner, Two Angles

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The original idea was to try out a different film, the Kodak PLUS-X 125, processed with Rodinal. Judging from the scanned pictures, my first impression is that it has a rougher, perhaps more old-fashioned look than the T-MAX 400 I usually prefer … While experimenting I realized that these two also seem to illustrate the idea of this week’s photo challenge.

Monopteron

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A contribution for the Weekly Photo Challenge: Masterpiece. This Monopteron, located on Wiesbaden’s Neroberg, was designed by P. Hoffmann in 1851 who used forms of early Florentine renaissance. So it appears to echo an echo of Greek Antiquity. But still: I like this building’s elegance and its sense of lightness (especially on a bright day), an I am intrigued by the way its circles and arches seem to form a vortex in this picture.